It’s Not Normal and It’s Not New

I hate the phrase “the new normal.” Implied in it is an expectation of psychological adjustment, without any of the requisite grief and mourning that adjustment will require for many. For some, their life narrative may have a framing of “life before COVID” and “life after COVID;” for others, this may not be the most significant shift in their story. Although the event is universal, the impact is unevenly distributed. I think it reeks of privilege and a shallowness of one’s capacity to feel to assume everyone, including people who are being disproportionally affected, should instantly absorb earth-shattering change and move on having potentially redefined nearly every aspect of their life as though nothing happened.

As a trauma survivor, the framing of the “new normal” is all too familiar. We have mantras like “forgive and forget” in our society as a way to absolve the bystanders of a need for collective grief when any one of us is harmed. This moment and the moments to follow deserve a witness. They deserve a deep grief, if not for our personal pain, for our collective suffering. I think we vary in terms of how much of this we can individually bear, but to mock and label cowardly those who do so on behalf of us all reveals much about one’s character. I hope life grants you the space and support to feel what you feel and to adjust to what is unfolding in your way and your own time.

Raise Your Toes (Today’s Daily Presence)

Today’s Daily Presence card invited awareness to my toes. I’ve managed to break more than one of them in recent years, so they could certainly use some TLC. I decided to spend some time conducting toe stretches.

In attempting the stretches I found, the simplest movement–placing my feet flat on the floor and reaching upward with my toes–seemed to help to adjust my toe posture. I discovered I do not have a lot of lateral mobility, especially in the second to last toe, which seems to be the one I’ve injured the most on both feet. I was tempted by the marble exercise but envisioned my dog trying to eat each one so I declined to pursue it.

I was intrigued by focusing solely on my toes as I haven’t done it before in terms of stretches, and I found that it challenged my body in a way it had not been before. I noticed some of my ankle and calf pain and tension unexpectedly releasing as I worked. I’ve lived so long with little awareness of my body, so I feel like I’m discovering new connections each time I slow down enough to attend to it. To whatever extent it exists, what is your relationship like with your toes? If you’ve had any injuries or loss of toe(s), what effect has it had on you? If it was accessible to you and you tried the toe stretches in the link, which one do you enjoy?